Featured

Covid-19: Protect the chronically-ill and the elderly, and let the others work, learn and play! For a differentiated confinement policy

Executive Summary

Based on public and official data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China, the Italian Epidemiological Institute (Istituto Superiore di Sanità) and Eurostat:

  • The Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19, i.e. the ratio of the number of people dying from the disease to the number of those infected, is in the range of 1%, but is strongly differentiated per population groups;
  • The Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 for the population aged 59 years or below is in the range of 0.07%, or 70 for 100,000 i.e. two times the fatality rate of accidents (of all kinds) in the EU;
  • The Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 for the population aged 60 years or above is in the range of 3.5%, i.e. strictly comparable to the existing death rate in the EU for people aged 65 years or more;
  • Provided the sample on co-morbidity conditions provided by the Italian Epidemiological Institute is representative, then the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 for the population with no chronic health condition is in the range of 0,03%, or 30 for 100,000 i.e. the fatality rate of accidents (of all kinds) in the EU.

Based on this, I recommend, instead of the immensely costly current policy of universal confinement, a policy of “differentiated confinement”, whereby:

  1. only the vulnerable population (the chronically ill and the elderly above a threshold age to be chosen between 60 and 70 years of age) is confined at home;
  2. the rest of the population is free to work, learn and play as normal, and to be infected by Covid-19, with a number of fatalities to be expected in that population in the range of that of accidents.

This “differentiated confinement” policy:

  • avoids most of the economic and social costs of an universal confinement, because most of the active population is not confined at home;
  • protects the vulnerable groups in the population efficiently;
  • is future-proof and robust against further surges in the propagation of Covid-19 in its transmission across the world, even if the development of an effective vaccine takes longer than expected.

The decisions of universal confinement of the population were rational and responsible in the situation of ignorance prevailing when they were taken

The current shutdown of economies and societies around the European Union and the world is grounded on one figure, and one assumption: the Crude Fatality Rate (number of reported deaths divided by the reported cases at a given date) is high, in the range of 3-4% (source WHO situation report 06 March 2020), and indiscriminate, killing the whole population more or less evenly, nobody being protected. If this is indeed true, then a simple mathematical extrapolation leads to millions of deaths in the European Union, which is morally unacceptable.

In front of this, two strategies are possible in the literature:

  • identify the infected people and put them in quarantine as long as they remain contagious, leaving the others to continue their normal lives. This strategy, called “containment”, requires the availability of tests, and that all infected people be tracked individually to test all the persons that they have been in contact with, so that all infected people be placed in quarantine before contaminating others. Containment is only feasible when the number of infected people is low, i.e. at the start of the epidemic outbreak – it is beyond reach when the figures are in the tens or hundreds of thousands; or
  • confine the whole population, so that the transmission rate falls below the threshold value of 1, and wait for the virus to die out.

The last option, called “suppression” is what the Chinese government and its people have achieved remarkably well, acting with extraordinary courage and clear-sightedness in an emergency situation where nothing was known on the virus. This is also what governments world-wide are doing, starting in Italy and in other Member States of the European Union – but at an immense economic and social cost. In the absence of any information on the lethality of the virus and on the characteristics of the population being killed by it, this option was the only rational and responsible one, and I am grateful to our governments that they have had the courage to take them.

These extremely costly decisions only make sense if the assumptions above hold true: a high, indiscriminate infection mortality rate.

Recently published data suggest an alternative strategy: differentiated confinement

Current, official, publicly available data with complementary features from the front-runners China and Italy tends to say that these assumptions are wrong, and suggest completely different public health – and economic – response strategies, namely to protect the chronically-ill and the elderly, and let the others work, learn and play, in a strategy that I would call “differentiated confinement” which I describe in greater detail at the end of this post.

This proposal is based on the following computations that I performed, based on public and official data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China, the Italian Epidemiological Institute (Istituto Superiore di Sanità) and Eurostat, and that I detail hereunder:

  • Infection Fatality Rate of the Covid-19, i.e. the ratio of the number of people dying from the disease to the number of those infected, for the whole population;
  • Infection Fatality Rate of the Covid-19 for vulnerable groups: the elderly and those with a chronic health condition.

The Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 is in the range of 1%

The first question to answer is: What is the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19? The Infection Fatality Rate estimates the fatality rate in all those with infection: the detected disease (cases) and those with an undetected disease (asymptomatic and not tested group).This is the key figure, as it summarises how dangerous the virus is, and the number of deaths to be anticipated in the population if the epidemic runs freely.

One first clear observation is that the Crude Fatality Rates differ enormously from one country to the next (from 0.4% in Germany – 149 deaths for 31,554 confirmed cases as of 25 March 2020, source WHO Situation report – to 9.85% in Italy– 6,820 deaths for 69,176 cases, same source – a 1 to 24 ratio, between two countries of comparable development levels, specifically when considering the North of Italy where most cases happen), or even between the Chinese city of Wuhan (5.8%) and other locations (0.7%) – source Report of the WHO-China Joint Mission on Coronavirus Disease 2019.

This Crude Fatality Rate is the ratio of two figures: the number of deaths due to COVID-19 and the number of cases of infection. The number of deaths relies on hard evidence, and is well-documented, because the registration of the cause of death is mandatory in the European Union and in many other jurisdictions. It can thus be considered as reliable. The number of cases of infection can be very strongly under-estimated because of under-reporting of mild or asymptomatic cases, of the unavailability of tests, and of national testing policies. A recently-published review of national health policies in the European Union regarding the attribution of Covid-19 tests by the well-recognised Robert Schuman Foundation illustrates this heterogeneity in the detection of cases: in Austria or Germany, screening tests are performed on any person having symptoms or having been in contact with an infected person (which has good chances of detecting a large fraction of the infected people), whereas in Spain, Italy or France tests are reserved to people with severe symptoms (and thus miss the bulk of infected, but mildly affected, people). The reported number of infected people is thus very unreliable, way below reality. As a conclusion, the most reliable figures for fatality rates are the lower ones, because they compare the (reliable) number of deaths to a number of cases of infection that is the less under-estimated.

The main flaw of calculating the Crude Fatality Rate is that it compares the number of deaths of a given day with the number of infected people of that same day – which makes the unrealistic assumption that a person infected dies on the same day, whereas in general a few days elapse between the two. This is problematic when these numbers grow at the currently observed high daily rates of ca. 25% / day. This is why the recommended method is to compare he number of deaths of a day with the number of infection cases of a number of days before, corresponding to the delay between infection and death.

The delay between infection and death is the sum of: (1) the incubation time, between infection and first symptoms, currently estimated by the WHO at 5 days, and (2) the time between first symptoms and death (when it occurs), currently estimated at 9 days by the Italian Epidemiological Institute (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The delay between infection and death can thus be estimated at 14 days in total.

I have performed this calculation on the data collected and updated daily by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control on the cases and deaths reported by each country, in this spreadsheet file. For China, I have collected the daily briefings provided by the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China for the province of Hubei, the first and hardest hit of all Chinese provinces. I then subtracted the figures for Hubei from the total figures for all of China to obtain figures for all provinces and territories except Hubei. These are territories where a very stringent, accurate and detailed tracking of all infected persons was performed, as described in the Report of the WHO-China Joint Mission on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

I estimated the Infection Fatality Rate as the ratio between the total number of deaths recorded in a territory at date T to the total number of infected cases at date (T – 14 days), in order to compare the number of deaths to the population of infected people among which these deaths can have developed. The results are summarised in this table, in which I only placed the countries with a reliable policy for tracking infections.

Country of fraction of countryLine in tableComputed Infection Fatality Rate
Austria38015,0%
China except Hubei14630,9%
Germany256210,0%
South Korea58431,6%
Japan35458,0%

Based on the previous reasoning, the most reliable figures are those where the number of reported infections underestimates reality the least, i.e. the lowest figures. Based on this, the Infection Fatality Rate for the whole population is in the range of 1%, i.e. ca. 10 times more than that of the seasonal flu.

The Infection Fatality Rate varies immensely with age and chronic health condition

The Chinese CDC Infectious Disease Information System has been excellent at tracking all infection cases in the provinces other than Hubei, but has a major limitation in that it does not require data on the health condition of Covid-19 patients (what is known as “co-morbidity”), nor on the age of patients.

Reciprocally, the Italian public health system has been very poor at tracking the infections (notably by restricting the usage of tests to the people with severe symptoms only), but has followed the co-morbidity condition and the age of the patients deceased from Covid-19. In its bi-weekly report, the latest of which being on 26 March 2020, it provides the breakdown of the existence and nature of co-morbidities in the 710 cases where the information was available among the 6,801 registered deaths in the country. Among these 710 cases, 97.9% had at least one chronic condition (mainly a cardio-vascular disease, but also diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer), and 50.7% had three co-morbidity conditions and above, while only 2.1% of deceased patients had no chronic condition – 50 times less than the number of those with at least one! Based on all cases registered, the mean age of deceased patients was 78 years. This means that the Infection Fatality Rate differs very strongly between people with no chronic health condition and those with at least one, and with age.

The Infection Fatality Rate for persons people above 60 years of age (resp. 70 years) can be computed as 3.5% (resp. 5%), a rate comparable to the natural death rate of people above 65 years of age – but only 0.07% (resp. 0.2%) for those younger, a rate comparable to the fatality rate of accidents

Based on this data, and making the reasonable assumption that the infected people are a random representative sample of the whole Italian population, I have computed the Infection Fatality Rates of the population above an age threshold and that of the population below that age threshold, for two values of the threshold: 60 years and 70 years. For each threshold, it is a simple calculation (linear system of two equations with two unknowns), taught in secondary education.

Let:

  • IFRyoung be the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 in Italy for the “young” persons, i.e. aged below the threshold (i.e. aged 59 years or below or 69 years or below) = i.e. our first unknown;
  • IFRold be the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 in Italy for the “old” persons , i.e. aged above the threshold (i.e. aged 60 years or above or 70 years or above) = i.e. our second unknown;
  • Rold be the fraction in the total population in Italy of the people aged above the threshold, as provided by Eurostat, table “Population on 1 January by age group and sex [demo_pjangroup]”. Rold = 16.9% for a threshold at 70 years, and 28.6% for 60 years.
  • IFRT be the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 for the total population, as computed above. IFRT = 1%
  • Nyoung be the total number of people deceased from Covid-19 in Italy aged below the threshold. Nyoung = 1,088 for 70 years and 327 for 60 years
  • Nold be the number of people deceased from Covid-19 in in Italy aged above the threshold. Nold = 5,713 for 70 years and 6,474 for 60 years

We know that:

  1. The Infection Fatality Rate for the total population is the weighted average of the Infection Fatality Rates for the two populations considered (above and below the threshold), with weightings proportional to their share in the total population:
    IFRT = Rold .IFRold + (1 – Rold).IFRyoung
    This is our first equation.
  2. Nold is proportional to the Infection Fatality Rate for the people above the threshold multiplied by their ratio in the population, and the same for Nyoung, so that the ratio between the two follows:
    Rold .IFRold / (1 – Rold).IFRyoung = Nold / Nyung
    This is our second equation.

We can solve it and obtain that:

  • the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 in Italy for the “young” persons aged below the threshold IFRyoung = IFRT . (1/(1-Rold)) . (Nyoung /(Nyoung +Nold)).
  • the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 in Italy for the “old” persons above the threshold IFRold = IFRT . (1/Rold) . (Nold /(Nyoung +Nold)).

Said differently, the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 for a sub-population is equal to the Infection Fatality Rate for the whole population, multiplied by the fraction of all deceased people from that sub-population, divided by the fraction of the total population represented by that sub-population.

Numerically, we have the following results.

Threshold between “young” and “old”60 years70 years
Computed Infection Fatality Rate for the “young” people = aged below the threshold0.067% = 67 for 100,0000,2% = 200 for 100,000
Computed Infection Fatality Rate for the “old” people = aged below the threshold3.5%5.0%

As a comparison:

  • the death rate due to accidents of all kinds in the EU27 was equal to 32 for 100,000 in 2016 (source Eurostat, Causes of death – crude death rate by NUTS 2 regions of residence, 3 year average [hlth_cd_ycdr2]), i.e. one half of the the Infection Fatality Rate for people aged 59 years and below
  • the death rate (all causes) for people aged above 65 years in 2016 (same source) was 4.36%, between the Infection Fatality Rate for people aged 60 years and above and that of people aged 70 years and above.

Provided an official data sample is representative, the Infection Fatality Rate for persons with chronic diseases can be estimated between 2.5% and 5% – but only 0.03% for the others, a rate equal to the fatality rate of accidents

Based on the data available from Italy on co-morbidity, and making the assumptions that (1) this sample is representative of all deceased cases in Italy and, which is very reasonable, (2) that the infected people are a random representative sample of the whole Italian population, I have computed the Infection Fatality Rate of the population with at least one co-morbidity condition and that of the population with none.

The same reasoning as above, with:

  • IFR0 the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 in Italy for the persons with no chronic health condition = i.e. our first unknown;
  • IFR1 the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 in Italy for the persons with at least one health chronic condition = i.e. our second unknown;
  • R1 be the fraction in the total population in Italy of the people with at least one chronic health condition among those cited as influencing death by Covid-19 (Coronary heart disease or angina pectoris, High blood pressure, Stroke or chronic consequences of stroke, Cirrhosis of the liver, Kidney problems, Diabetes ), as provided by Eurostat, table “Persons reporting a chronic disease, by disease, sex, age and educational attainment level (hlth_ehis_cd1e)”. The highest possible value for R1 would be based on the assumption that people only have one chronic condition, so that the figures for all conditions add up. The lowest possible value would be based on the assumption that all persons with at least one of these conditions have the chronic health condition with the largest prevalence, namely high blood pressure, so that the figures don’t add up and are equal to the largest among them. As a conclusion, 20.6% ≤ R1 ≤ 35.2%.
  • IFRT the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 for the total population, as computed above. IFRT = 1%
  • N0 the number of people deceased from Covid-19 in the sample observed with no chronic health condition. N0 = 15
  • N1 the number of people deceased from Covid-19 in the sample observed with at least one chronic health condition. N1 = 695

leads to:

  • the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 in Italy for the persons with no chronic health condition IFR0 = IFRT . (1/(1-R1)) . (N0 /(N0 +N1)) = between 0,026 and 0.03%, dependent upon the value of R1, i.e. between 26 and 30 for 100,000.
  • the Infection Fatality Rate of Covid-19 in Italy for the persons with at least one health chronic condition IFR1 = IFRT . (1/R1) . (N1 /(N0 +N1)) = between 2.78% and 4.75% dependent upon the value of R1.

As a comparison, the death rate due to accidents of all kinds in the EU27 was equal to 32 for 100,000 in 2016 (source Eurostat, Causes of death – crude death rate by NUTS 2 regions of residence, 3 year average [hlth_cd_ycdr2]), i.e. strictly comparable to the Infection Fatality Rate for people with no chronic health condition.

Considering the immense economic and social costs of universal confinement, a differentiated confinement policy would be more efficient and yet ethically sound

The current policy of universal confinement of the population aims at suppressing the propagation of the virus causing Covid-19, so that the virus dies out with most of the population left uninfected. There are two important problems to this policy:

  • the economic and social costs are immense. This confinement prevents most people from working, and shuts down most of the economy, so that the economic survival of vast segments of the productive system is jeopardised. It thus creates massive unemployment and social disruption, and hence massive fatalities, as all deep economic crises do. The only means to limit the damage being massive additional public debt. Roughly speaking, every day of universal confinement is a day of lost GDP, and thus adds 0.3% (1/365) of annual GDP to the public debt;
  • the solution is only provisional, and requires additional, and equally costly, shutdowns of the economy at each new surge of the pandemic, as it travels round the world and comes back from a location where it hasn’t been suppressed. This is because the population has not been infected, and has thus not developed a resistance to the virus. The Imperial College Covid-19 response team has modelled in its Report n°9 of 16 March 2020 that “social distancing” (= confinement) and the closure of schools and colleges would need to be applied ca. 2/3 of the time after the initial period of universal confinement, until a vaccine is developed, i.e. over 12 to 18 months – if everything goes well.

As an alternative, I propose a “differentiated confinement” policy, whereby:

  1. only the vulnerable population is confined at home. The vulnerable population can be defined as the elderly above a threshold to be chosen between 60 and 70 years of age, or the persons having at least one of the chronic health conditions increasing the fatality rate of Covid-19. In the absence of micro-data on the people deceased, I can’t tell whether all the elderly people (including those with no chronic health condition) and all those with at least one chronic health condition (including those below the age threshold) should be confined, or whether the confinement should only apply to those persons meeting both conditions (aged above the threshold and having at least one chronic health condition). Thereby, the number of vulnerable people being infected by Covid-19 – and thus also that of fatalities and of Intensive Care Units being used – is minimised. Conveniently, this is a population of people that generally are retired and do not work. Their absence from the productive system does not compromise its operation;
  2. the rest of the population is free to work, learn and play as normal, and to be infected by Covid-19, with very few among them incurring fatal consequences of this, at a ratio comparable to that of accidents, a risk that everyone is obviously ready to take. Having been infected, this population becomes immune to further surges of the virus, and protects the vulnerable people, so that subsequent differentiated confinements (which would still need to be considered) are less necessary. This population constitutes the bulk of the active population, and can therefore operate the productive system almost at full efficiency.

This “differentiated confinement” policy that I propose thus:

  • avoids most of the economic and social costs of an universal confinement, because the productive system continues operating with only limited restrictions;
  • protects the vulnerable groups in the population efficiently;
  • is future-proof and robust against further surges in the propagation of Covid-19 in its transmission across the world, even if the development of an effective vaccine takes longer than expected.

I strongly encourage governments, in the European Union and beyond, to consider this option.

I also wish that governments will display the same capacity to act with speed, boldness, determination and sense of priorities between economic interests and survival of our human societies, when taking measures on climate and biodiversity for the sake of the younger and future generations, as what they have recently done on Covid-19 to save the single generation of those currently at the end of their lives.

Covid-19 : Protégez les malades chroniques et les personnes âgées, et laissez les autres travailler, apprendre et jouer ! Pour une politique de confinement différencié

Résumé

Sur la base des données publiques et officielles du Centre européen de prévention et de contrôle des maladies, de la Commission nationale de la santé de la République populaire de Chine, de l’Institut italien d’épidémiologie (Istituto Superiore di Sanità) et d’Eurostat :

  • Le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19, c’est-à-dire le rapport entre le nombre de personnes qui meurent de la maladie et le nombre de personnes infectées, est de l’ordre de 1 %, mais il est fortement différencié selon les groupes de population ;
  • Le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 pour la population âgée de 59 ans ou moins est de l’ordre de 0,07 %, ou de 70 pour 100 000, soit deux fois le taux de mortalité des accidents (de tous types) dans l’UE ;
  • Le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 pour la population âgée de 60 ans ou plus est de l’ordre de 3,5 %, c’est-à-dire strictement comparable au taux de mortalité existant dans l’UE pour les personnes âgées de 65 ans ou plus ;
  • Si l’échantillon sur les conditions de comorbidité fourni par l’Institut épidémiologique italien est représentatif, alors le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 pour la population sans maladie chronique est de l’ordre de 0,03 %, ou de 30 pour 100 000, soit le taux de mortalité par accident (de tous types) dans l’UE.

Sur cette base, je recommande, au lieu de la politique actuelle de confinement universel, extrêmement coûteuse, une politique de “confinement différencié“, par laquelle :

  1. seule la population vulnérable (les malades chroniques et les personnes âgées au-delà d’un âge seuil à choisir entre 60 et 70 ans) est confinée à domicile ;
  2. le reste de la population est libre de travailler, d’apprendre et de jouer normalement, et d’être infecté par le Covid-19, avec un nombre de décès à prévoir dans cette population dans la fourchette de celui des accidents.

Cette politique de “confinement différencié” :

  • évite la plupart des coûts économiques et sociaux d’un confinement universel, car la majeure partie de la population active n’est pas confinée chez elle ;
  • protège efficacement les groupes vulnérables de la population ;
  • est à l’épreuve du temps et robuste contre de nouvelles poussées de propagation de Covid-19 dans sa transmission à travers le monde, même si le développement d’un vaccin efficace prend plus de temps que prévu.

Les décisions de confinement universel de la population étaient rationnelles et responsables dans la situation d’ignorance qui prévalait au moment où elles ont été prises

L’arrêt actuel des économies et des sociétés dans l’Union européenne et dans le monde repose sur un chiffre et une hypothèse : le taux brut de mortalité (nombre de décès déclarés divisé par le nombre de cas déclarés à une date donnée) est élevé, de l’ordre de 3 à 4 % (source : rapport de situation de l’OMS du 6 mars 2020), et ce sans discrimination, tuant plus ou moins également l’ensemble de la population, personne n’étant protégé. Si cela est effectivement vrai, alors une simple extrapolation mathématique conduit à des millions de morts dans l’Union européenne, ce qui est moralement inacceptable.

Face à cela, deux stratégies sont possibles dans la littérature :

  • identifier les personnes infectées et les mettre en quarantaine tant qu’elles restent contagieuses, en laissant les autres poursuivre leur vie normale. Cette stratégie, appelée “endiguement”, exige la disponibilité de tests et le suivi individuel de toutes les personnes infectées pour tester toutes les personnes avec lesquelles elles ont été en contact, de sorte que toutes les personnes infectées soient placées en quarantaine avant de contaminer les autres. Le confinement n’est possible que lorsque le nombre de personnes infectées est faible, c’est-à-dire au début de l’épidémie – il est hors de portée lorsque les chiffres se comptent en dizaines ou en centaines de milliers ; ou
  • confiner toute la population, de sorte que le taux de transmission tombe en dessous de la valeur seuil de 1, et attendre que le virus s’éteigne.

La dernière option, appelée “suppression”, est ce que le gouvernement chinois et son peuple ont remarquablement bien réussi à faire, en agissant avec un courage et une clairvoyance extraordinaires dans une situation d’urgence où l’on ne savait rien sur le virus. C’est également ce que font les gouvernements du monde entier, à commencer par l’Italie et d’autres États membres de l’Union européenne – mais à un coût économique et social immense. En l’absence de toute information sur la létalité du virus et sur les caractéristiques de la population qu’il tue, cette option était la seule rationnelle et responsable, et je suis reconnaissant à nos gouvernements d’avoir eu le courage de les prendre.

Ces décisions extrêmement coûteuses n’ont de sens que si les hypothèses ci-dessus se vérifient : un taux de mortalité infectieuse élevé et sans discernement.

Des données récemment publiées suggèrent une stratégie alternative : le confinement différencié

Les données actuelles, officielles et accessibles au public, issues des pays en avance dans l’épidémie, la Chine et l’Italie, et qui présentent des caractéristiques complémentaires, tendent à dire que ces hypothèses sont fausses et suggèrent des stratégies de réponse de santé publique – et économique – complètement différentes, à savoir protéger les malades chroniques et les personnes âgées, et laisser les autres travailler, apprendre et jouer, dans une stratégie que j’appellerais “confinement différencié” et que je décris plus en détail à la fin de ce billet.

Cette proposition est fondée sur les calculs suivants que j’ai effectués, sur la base de données publiques et officielles du Centre européen de prévention et de contrôle des maladies, de la Commission nationale de la santé de la République populaire de Chine, de l’Institut italien d’épidémiologie (Istituto Superiore di Sanità) et d’Eurostat, et que je détaille ci-dessous :

  • Taux de mortalité par infection du Covid-19, c’est-à-dire le rapport entre le nombre de personnes qui meurent de la maladie et le nombre de personnes infectées, pour l’ensemble de la population ;
  • Taux de mortalité par infection du Covid-19 pour les groupes vulnérables : les personnes âgées et les personnes souffrant d’une maladie chronique.

Le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 est de l’ordre de 1%

La première question à laquelle il faut répondre est la suivante : Quel est le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 ? Le taux de mortalité par infection estime le taux de mortalité chez tous ceux qui sont infectés : la maladie détectée (cas) et ceux qui ont une maladie non détectée (groupe asymptomatique et non testé). C’est le chiffre clé, car il résume le danger que représente le virus et le nombre de décès à prévoir dans la population si l’épidémie se propage librement.

Une première constatation claire est que les taux bruts de mortalité diffèrent énormément d’un pays à l’autre (de 0,4 % en Allemagne – 149 décès pour 31 554 cas confirmés au 25 mars 2020, source OMS Rapport de situation – à 9.85 % en Italie – 6 820 décès pour 69 176 cas, même source – un rapport de 1 à 24, entre deux pays de niveau de développement comparable, en particulier si l’on considère le nord de l’Italie où la plupart des cas se produisent), ou même entre la ville chinoise de Wuhan (5,8 %) et d’autres endroits (0,7 %) – source Rapport de la mission conjointe OMS-Chine sur les maladies à coronavirus 2019.

Ce taux brut de mortalité est le rapport de deux chiffres : le nombre de décès dus à la COVID-19 et le nombre de cas d’infection. Le nombre de décès repose sur des preuves solides et est bien documenté, car l’enregistrement de la cause du décès est obligatoire dans l’Union européenne et dans de nombreuses autres juridictions. Il peut donc être considéré comme fiable. Le nombre de cas d’infection peut être très fortement sous-estimé en raison de la sous-déclaration des cas bénins ou asymptomatiques, de l’indisponibilité des tests et des politiques nationales en matière de tests. Une étude publiée récemment sur les politiques sanitaires nationales de l’Union européenne concernant l’attribution des tests Covid-19 par la très reconnue Fondation Robert Schuman illustre cette hétérogénéité dans la détection des cas : en Autriche ou en Allemagne, les tests de dépistage sont effectués sur toute personne présentant des symptômes ou ayant été en contact avec une personne infectée (qui a de bonnes chances de détecter une grande partie des personnes infectées), alors qu’en Espagne, en Italie ou en France, les tests sont réservés aux personnes présentant des symptômes graves (et ratent donc la majeure partie des personnes infectées, mais légèrement affectées). Le nombre déclaré de personnes infectées est donc très peu fiable, bien en deçà de la réalité. En conclusion, les chiffres les plus fiables concernant les taux de mortalité sont les plus bas, car ils comparent le nombre (fiable) de décès à un nombre de cas d’infection qui est le moins sous-estimé.

Le principal défaut du calcul du taux brut de mortalité est qu’il compare le nombre de décès d’un jour donné avec le nombre de personnes infectées le même jour – ce qui suppose de manière irréaliste qu’une personne infectée meurt le même jour, alors qu’en général quelques jours s’écoulent entre les deux. Cela pose problème lorsque ces chiffres augmentent aux taux journaliers élevés actuellement observés d’environ 25% / jour. C’est pourquoi la méthode recommandée consiste à comparer le nombre de décès d’un jour avec le nombre de cas d’infection d’un certain nombre de jours auparavant, correspondant au délai entre l’infection et le décès.

Le délai entre l’infection et la mort est la somme de : (1) le temps d’incubation, entre l’infection et les premiers symptômes, actuellement estimé à 5 jours par l’OMS, et (2) le temps entre les premiers symptômes et le décès (quand il survient), actuellement estimé à 9 jours par l’Institut italien d’épidémiologie (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). Le délai entre l’infection et le décès peut donc être estimé à 14 jours au total.

J’ai effectué ce calcul sur la base des données collectées et mises à jour quotidiennement par le Centre européen de prévention et de contrôle des maladies sur les cas et les décès signalés par chaque pays, dans ce fichier de tableur. Pour la Chine, j’ai rassemblé les informations quotidiennes fournies par la Commission nationale de la santé de la République populaire de Chine pour la province de Hubei, la première et la plus touchée de toutes les provinces chinoises. J’ai ensuite soustrait les chiffres pour le Hubei des chiffres totaux pour l’ensemble de la Chine afin d’obtenir les chiffres pour toutes les provinces et territoires, à l’exception du Hubei. Il s’agit de territoires où un suivi très rigoureux, précis et détaillé de toutes les personnes infectées a été effectué, comme le décrit le rapport de la mission conjointe OMS-Chine sur la maladie à coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

J’ai estimé le taux de mortalité par infection comme étant le rapport entre le nombre total de décès enregistrés sur un territoire à la date T et le nombre total de cas infectés à la date (T – 14 jours), afin de comparer le nombre de décès à la population de personnes infectées parmi lesquelles ces décès peuvent s’être développés. Les résultats sont résumés dans ce tableau, dans lequel je n’ai placé que les pays ayant une politique fiable de suivi des infections.

Pays de la fraction de paysLigne dans le tableauTaux de mortalité infectieuse calculé
Autriche38015,0%
Chine sauf Hubei14630,9%
Allemagne256210,0%
Corée du Sud58431,6%
Japon35458,0%

Selon le raisonnement précédent, les chiffres les plus fiables sont ceux où le nombre d’infections déclarées sous-estime le moins la réalité, c’est-à-dire les chiffres les plus bas. Sur cette base, le taux de mortalité par infection pour l’ensemble de la population est de l’ordre de 1 %, soit environ 10 fois plus que celui de la grippe saisonnière.

Le taux de mortalité par infection varie énormément en fonction de l’âge et de l’état de santé

Le système d’information sur les maladies infectieuses des CDC chinois a été excellent pour suivre tous les cas d’infection dans les provinces autres que le Hubei, mais il présente une limite majeure dans la mesure où il ne nécessite pas de données sur l’état de santé des patients atteints de Covid-19 (ce que l’on appelle la “comorbidité”), ni sur l’âge des patients.

Réciproquement, le système de santé publique italien a été très peu performant dans le suivi des infections (notamment en limitant l’utilisation des tests aux seules personnes présentant des symptômes graves), mais a suivi l’état de comorbidité et l’âge des patients décédés des suites de la maladie de Covid-19. Dans son rapport bimensuel, dont le en date est celui du 26 mars 2020, il fournit la ventilation de l’existence et de la nature des comorbidités dans les 710 cas où l’information était disponible parmi les 6 801 décès enregistrés dans le pays. Parmi ces 710 cas, 97,9% avaient au moins une maladie chronique (principalement une maladie cardio-vasculaire, mais aussi le diabète, une maladie pulmonaire obstructive chronique, un cancer), et 50,7% avaient trois conditions de comorbidité et plus, alors que seulement 2,1% des patients décédés n’avaient aucune condition chronique – 50 fois moins que le nombre de ceux qui en avaient au moins une ! Sur la base de tous les cas enregistrés, l’âge moyen des patients décédés était de 78 ans. Cela signifie que le taux de mortalité par infection diffère très fortement entre les personnes sans maladie chronique et celles qui en ont au moins une, et avec l’âge.

Le taux de mortalité par infection pour les personnes de plus de 60 ans (resp. 70 ans) peut être calculé comme étant de 3,5% (resp. 5%), un taux comparable au taux de mortalité naturelle des personnes de plus de 65 ans – mais seulement 0,07% (resp. 0,2%) pour les personnes plus jeunes, un taux comparable au taux de mortalité par accident

Sur la base de ces données, et en partant de l’hypothèse raisonnable que les personnes infectées constituent un échantillon aléatoire représentatif de l’ensemble de la population italienne, j’ai calculé les taux de mortalité par infection de la population au-dessus d’un seuil d’âge et de la population en dessous de ce seuil, pour deux valeurs du seuil : 60 ans et 70 ans. Pour chaque seuil, il s’agit d’un calcul simple (système linéaire de deux équations avec deux inconnues), enseigné dans l’enseignement secondaire.

Soit :

  • IFRyoung le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 en Italie pour les “jeunes”, c’est-à-dire les personnes âgées de moins de 59 ans ou moins ou de 69 ans ou moins = c’est-à-dire notre première inconnue ;
  • IFRold le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 en Italie pour les personnes “âgées”, c’est-à-dire âgées de plus de 60 ans ou de 70 ans ou plus = c’est-à-dire notre deuxième inconnu ;
  • Rold la fraction de la population totale en Italie des personnes âgées au-dessus du seuil, tel que fourni par Eurostat, tableau “Population au 1er janvier par groupe d’âge et par sexe [demo_pjangroup]“. Rold = 16,9% pour un seuil à 70 ans, et 28,6% pour 60 ans.
  • IFRT le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 pour la population totale, tel que calculé ci-dessus. IFRT = 1 %.
  • Nyoungest le nombre total de personnes décédées de Covid-19 en Italie et dont l’âge était inférieur au seuil. Nyoung = 1 088 pour 70 ans et 327 pour 60 ans
  • Nold nombre de personnes décédées de Covid-19 en Italie dont l’âge dépassait le seuil. Nold = 5 713 pour 70 ans et 6 474 pour 60 ans

Nous savons que :

  1. Le taux de mortalité par infection pour la population totale est la moyenne pondérée des taux de mortalité par infection pour les deux populations considérées (au-dessus et en dessous du seuil), avec des pondérations proportionnelles à leur part dans la population totale : IFRT = Rold . IFRold + (1 – Rold).IFRyoung
    est notre première équation.
  2. Nold est proportionnel au taux de mortalité par infection pour les personnes au-dessus du seuil multiplié par leur ratio dans la population, et le même pour Nyoung, de sorte que le ratio entre les deux suit : Rold . IFRold / (1 – Rold).IFRyoung = Nold / Nyoung C’est notre deuxième équation.

Nous pouvons le résoudre et obtenir :

  • le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 en Italie pour les “jeunes” âgés en dessous du seuil IFRyoung = IFRT (1/(1-Rold)) . (Nyoung /(Nyoung +Nold)) .
  • le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 en Italie pour les personnes “âgées” au-dessus du seuil IFRold = IFRT . (1/Rold) . (Nold /(Nyoung +Nold)).

Autrement dit, le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 pour une sous-population est égal au taux de mortalité par infection pour l’ensemble de la population, multiplié par la fraction de toutes les personnes décédées appartenant à cette sous-population, divisé par la fraction de la population totale représentée par cette sous-population.

Numériquement, nous avons les résultats suivants.

Seuil entre les “jeunes” et les “vieux”60 ans70 ans
Taux de mortalité par infection calculé pour les “jeunes” = âge inférieur au seuil0.067% = 67 pour 100 0000,2% = 200 pour 100.000
Taux de mortalité par infection calculé pour les “personnes âgées” = âge inférieur au seuil3.5%5.0%

A titre de comparaison :

  • le taux de mortalité due aux accidents de toute nature dans l’UE27 était égal à 32 pour 100 000 en 2016 (source Eurostat, Causes de décès – taux brut de mortalité par région de résidence NUTS 2, moyenne sur 3 ans [hlth_cd_ycdr2]), soit la moitié du taux de mortalité par infection pour les personnes âgées de 59 ans et moins
  • le taux de mortalité (toutes causes confondues) des personnes âgées de plus de 65 ans en 2016 (même source) était de 4,36 %, entre le taux de mortalité par infection des personnes âgées de 60 ans et plus et celui des personnes âgées de 70 ans et plus.

À condition qu’un échantillon de données officielles soit représentatif, le taux de mortalité par infection pour les personnes atteintes de maladies chroniques peut être estimé entre 2,5 % et 5 % – mais seulement 0,03 % pour les autres, un taux égal au taux de mortalité par accident

Sur la base des données disponibles en Italie sur la comorbidité, et en partant de l’hypothèse que (1) cet échantillon est représentatif de tous les cas décédés en Italie et, (2), ce qui est très raisonnable, que les personnes infectées constituent un échantillon aléatoire représentatif de l’ensemble de la population italienne, j’ai calculé le taux de mortalité par infection de la population présentant au moins un état de comorbidité et celui de la population n’en présentant aucun.

Le même raisonnement que ci-dessus, avec :

  • IFR0 le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 en Italie pour les personnes sans maladie chronique = c’est-à-dire notre première inconnue ;
  • IFR1 le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 en Italie pour les personnes souffrant d’au moins une maladie chronique = c’est-à-dire notre deuxième inconnu ;
  • R1 la fraction de la population totale en Italie des personnes souffrant d’au moins une maladie chronique parmi celles citées comme ayant une influence sur la mortalité par Covid-19 (maladie coronarienne ou angine de poitrine, hypertension artérielle, accident vasculaire cérébral ou conséquences chroniques d’un accident vasculaire cérébral, cirrhose du foie, problèmes rénaux, diabète), telle que fournie par Eurostat, tableau “Personnes déclarant une maladie chronique, par maladie, sexe, âge et niveau d’éducation (hlth_ehis_cd1e)“. La valeur la plus élevée possible pour R1 serait basée sur l’hypothèse que les personnes ne souffrent que d’une seule maladie chronique, de sorte que les chiffres pour toutes les maladies s’additionnent. La valeur la plus basse possible serait basée sur l’hypothèse que toutes les personnes atteintes d’au moins une de ces maladies ont la maladie chronique dont la prévalence est la plus élevée, à savoir l’hypertension artérielle, de sorte que les chiffres ne s’additionnent pas et sont égaux à la plus grande d’entre elles. En conclusion, 20,6 % ≤ R1 ≤ 35,2 %.
  • IFRT le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 pour la population totale, tel que calculé ci-dessus. IFRT = 1 %.
  • N0 le nombre de personnes décédées de Covid-19 dans l’échantillon observé sans maladie chronique. N0 = 15
  • N1 le nombre de personnes décédées de Covid-19 dans l’échantillon observé avec au moins un problème de santé chronique. N1 = 695

conduit à :

  • le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 en Italie pour les personnes sans maladie chronique IFR0 = IFRT (1/(1-R1)) . (N0 /(N0 +N1)) = entre 0,026 et 0,03%, en fonction de la valeur de R1, c’est à dires entre 26 et 30 pour 100 000.
  • le taux de mortalité par infection de Covid-19 en Italie pour les personnes souffrant d’au moins une maladie chronique de santé IFR1 = IFRT . (1/R1) . (N1 /(N0 +N1)) = entre 2,78% et 4,75% selon la valeur de R1.

À titre de comparaison, le taux de mortalité dû aux accidents de toute nature dans l’UE27 était égal à 32 pour 100 000 en 2016 (source Eurostat, Causes de décès – taux brut de mortalité par région de résidence NUTS 2, moyenne sur 3 ans [hlth_cd_ycdr2]), c’est-à-dire strictement comparable au taux de mortalité par infection pour les personnes ne souffrant d’aucune maladie chronique.

Compte tenu des coûts économiques et sociaux immenses de le confinement universel, une politique de confinement différenciée serait plus efficace et pourtant éthiquement valide

La politique actuelle de confinement universel de la population vise à supprimer la propagation du virus causant le Covid-19, de sorte que le virus s’éteigne sans que la majeure partie de la population ne soit infectée. Cette politique se heurte à deux problèmes importants :

  • les coûts économiques et sociaux sont immenses. Cet confinement empêche la plupart des gens de travailler, et ferme la majeure partie de l’économie, de sorte que la survie économique de vastes segments du système de production est compromise. Il crée ainsi un chômage massif et des perturbations sociales, et donc des décès massifs, comme le font toutes les crises économiques profondes. Le seul moyen de limiter les dégâts est une dette publique supplémentaire massive. En gros, chaque jour de confinement universel est un jour de PIB perdu, et ajoute donc 0,3 % (1/365) du PIB annuel à la dette publique ;
  • la solution n’est que provisoire et nécessite des arrêts supplémentaires, tout aussi coûteux, de l’économie à chaque nouvelle poussée de la pandémie, car celle-ci fait le tour du monde et revient d’un endroit où elle n’a pas été réprimée. Cela est dû au fait que la population n’a pas été infectée et n’a donc pas développé de résistance au virus. L’équipe d’intervention de l’Imperial College Covid-19 a modélisé dans son rapport n°9 du 16 mars 2020 que la “distanciation sociale” (= confinement) et la fermeture des écoles et des collèges devraient être appliquées environ 2/3 du temps après la période initiale de confinement universel, jusqu’à ce qu’un vaccin soit développé, c’est-à-dire sur 12 à 18 mois – si tout va bien.

Comme alternative, je propose une politique de “confinement différencié”, par laquelle :

  1. seule la population vulnérable est confinée chez elle. La population vulnérable peut être définie comme les personnes âgées dépassant un seuil à choisir entre 60 et 70 ans, ou les personnes ayant au moins une des maladies chroniques augmentant le taux de mortalité de Covid-19. En l’absence de micro-données sur les personnes décédées, je ne peux pas dire si toutes les personnes âgées (y compris celles n’ayant pas de maladie chronique) et toutes celles ayant au moins une maladie chronique (y compris celles en dessous du seuil d’âge) devraient être confinées, ou si le confinement devrait s’appliquer uniquement aux personnes remplissant les deux conditions (âgées au-dessus du seuil et ayant au moins une maladie chronique). Ainsi, le nombre de personnes vulnérables infectées par le Covid-19 – et donc aussi le nombre de décès et d’unités de soins intensifs utilisées – est réduit au minimum. Il se trouve qu’il s’agit d’une population de personnes qui sont généralement à la retraite et ne travaillent pas. Leur absence du système de production ne compromet pas son fonctionnement ;
  2. le reste de la population est libre de travailler, d’apprendre et de jouer normalement, et d’être infecté par le Covid-19, très peu d’entre eux en subissant les conséquences fatales, dans un rapport comparable à celui des accidents, un risque que tout le monde est manifestement prêt à prendre. Ayant été infectée, cette population devient immunisée contre les nouvelles poussées du virus et protège les personnes vulnérables, de sorte que les confinements différenciés ultérieurs (qui devraient encore être envisagés) sont moins nécessaires. Cette population constitue la majeure partie de la population active et peut donc faire fonctionner le système de production presque à plein rendement.

Cette politique de “confinement différencié” que je propose ainsi :

  • évite la plupart des coûts économiques et sociaux d’un confinement universel, car le système de production continue à fonctionner avec seulement des restrictions limitées ;
  • protège efficacement les groupes vulnérables de la population ;
  • est à l’épreuve du temps et robuste contre de nouvelles poussées de propagation de Covid-19 dans sa transmission à travers le monde, même si le développement d’un vaccin efficace prend plus de temps que prévu.

J’encourage vivement les gouvernements, dans l’Union européenne et au-delà, à envisager cette option.

Je souhaite également que les gouvernements fassent preuve de la même capacité à agir avec rapidité, audace, détermination et sens des priorités entre les intérêts économiques et la survie de nos sociétés humaines, lorsqu’ils prennent des mesures sur le climat et la biodiversité pour le bien des jeunes et des générations futures, que ce qu’ils ont fait récemment sur Covid-19 pour sauver la seule génération de ceux qui sont actuellement en fin de vie.

Debt towards humans, or towards natural / social phenomena? Classical accounting gives the wrong answer

I identify two very different types of debt:

  • towards human creditors, or
  • towards natural or social phenomena.

Debt towards human creditors is the most visible form of debt. It is recorded in public or private accounts, and is the purpose of active monitoring, in order to ensure that the debtor keeps a sustainable capacity to pay the creditor back. The rights of creditors are defended by national and international law.

However, debt towards humans is not as hard as what could appear prima facie.

Continue reading “Debt towards humans, or towards natural / social phenomena? Classical accounting gives the wrong answer”

Feeding the reptile or promoting the human in us: why political communication is not morally neutral, and how to improve it (2/2)

(Figure: Media Respect Cube, displaying the level of respect of the receiver, per technical feature of the communication medium. The higher the score, the higher the respect. Author: Sergio Arbarviro, under licence Creative Commons)

(Follows the previous post)

Regarding now the technical medium, I would have the following considerations:

Continue reading “Feeding the reptile or promoting the human in us: why political communication is not morally neutral, and how to improve it (2/2)”

Feeding the reptile or promoting the human in us: why political communication is not morally neutral, and how to improve it (1/2)

Social medium Facebook and “big data” firm Cambridge Analytica have broken the news in March 2018 when their methods of political manipulation in the electoral campaign of Donald Trump in 2016 were made public. Why is it that the revelations on the Facebook – Cambridge Analytica affair appear morally so unacceptable?

I would like here to suggest a method, based on the well-established layer-based model of the human brain, to trace a moral distinction between tools used in political communication.

Continue reading “Feeding the reptile or promoting the human in us: why political communication is not morally neutral, and how to improve it (1/2)”

Costa-Rica as a role model for humanity

The ultimate goal of public policy in the 21st century may be expressed in very simple terms: ensure good living conditions to the population – while respecting the 9 environmental planetary boundaries that set limits to our production and consumption (climate change; rate of biodiversity loss; interference with the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles; stratospheric ozone depletion; ocean acidification; global freshwater use; change in land use; chemical pollution; and atmospheric aerosol loading). Is this goal achievable? The answer is yes, because it has already been achieved by one country: Costa-Rica. The good news is: this achievement is the outcome of deliberate policies, not of mere chance.

Continue reading “Costa-Rica as a role model for humanity”

The shareholders aren’t any more the most legitimate to govern companies

Source of data in the image: World Bank, stocks traded, turnover ratio of traded shares.

When asked about who should govern companies, the most obvious answer seems to be: the shareholders. And the reason: because they are the owners. Period. Debate closed. Recent discussions about the increased role of other stakeholders, be they the workers, representatives of external interests such as those of the environment or of suppliers, are seen like nice add-ons, little more than an inflexion to a generally valid rule.

I disagree, and believe that the role of the shareholders in the governance of companies should be radically reconsidered.

Continue reading “The shareholders aren’t any more the most legitimate to govern companies”